Colorado Lemon Laws

New cars with serious problems that the dealer is unable to fix after a reasonable amount of attempts are called "lemons." State lemon laws hold manufacturers and dealers accountable for new vehicles that fail to live up to their warranty within a stated period of time, requiring replacement or a full refund. Statutes are fairly similar from one state to another, and some states also have similar protections for used car purchases.

Colorado Lemon Law at a Glance

Automobiles covered under the Colorado Motor Vehicle Warranties Act are those that have a "nonconformity," for which there's no specific definition. If a defect or condition substantially impairs the use and market value within one year after taking delivery of your new car, then it may be considered a lemon. The manufacturer has the option to either replace it with a comparable vehicle or offer full refund (minus a "reasonable allowance" for the purchaser's use).

Code Section 42-10-101, et seq.
Title of Act Motor Vehicle Warranties
Definition of Defects Nonconformity to express warranties which substantially impairs use and market value of motor vehicle
Time Limit for Manufacturer Repair Warranty period or within 1 year following date of original delivery of vehicle to consumer, whichever is the earlier date
Remedies Manufacturer's option: replace with comparable vehicle or accept return of vehicle from consumer and refund full purchase price, including sales tax, fees and similar governmental charges, less a reasonable allowance for consumer's use

Note: State laws are constantly changing. We make every effort to maintain the accuracy of these pages, but be sure to contact a Colorado lemon law attorney or conduct your own legal research to verify the state law(s) you are researching.

How to File a Lemon Claim in Colorado

The Colorado Attorney General's Office states that you must first notify the manufacturer through certified mail about the problem once your automobile has met the following criteria:

  • In for repair 4 or more times for the same defect; or
  • Out of service for 30 or more business days (accumulative);
  • During the warranty period or one year from delivery, whichever comes first

If the problem is not resolved, you must pursue any informal dispute resolution procedures offered by the manufacturer before filing a civil suit. Visit the Better Business Bureau's Auto Line for information about arbitrating a lemon claim.

Research the Law

Colorado Lemon Laws: Related Resources

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