Connecticut Adoption Laws

Adopting a child: it's a big step for both the parents and the child. This life altering choice can be a joyous occasion for prospective parents. It's not without its legal hurdles, however. The adoption process can be complicated, both emotionally and legally. Each state has laws regarding who can adopt, who can be adopted, and how, and these laws can be hard to navigate. So here is a quick summary of adoption laws in Connecticut.

State Adoption Laws

Regulations and laws regarding adoption, including who may adopt and special requirements for adoptive parents, are similar among most states. While there may be minor differences in the statutes, states generally keep adoption regulations things pretty uniform. Connecticut children 12 and older must give consent to adoption. Adoption is a complicated (and important) process, and it is wise to contact an experienced Connecticut adoption attorney for assistance.

Adoption Statutes in Connecticut

The various state adoption laws can differ depending on where you live. Below are some of the highlights of Connecticut adoption laws from Chapter 803 of the Connecticut General Statutes, including regulations on who may adopt, child consent requirements, and the relevant procedures.

Code Section 45a-724 to 765; No
Who May Be Adopted Any person (except between persons over age of majority, there must be written consent of spouses if any of adopted person)
Age that Child's Consent Needed 12 years and older
Who May Adopt Married persons must join in adoption unless court finds sufficient reason for nonjoinder; sexual orientation of prospective parents may be considered
Home Residency Required Prior to Finalization of Adoption? No
State Agency/Court Children and Youth Services/Probate Court
Statute of Limitations to Challenge Not specified

Note: State laws are constantly changing -- conduct your own legal research to verify the state law(s) you are researching.

In most cases, any married couple or single adult is eligible to adopt. Thus far, the laws in most states are largely silent on the issue of adoption by gay and lesbian individuals: only Utah and Mississippi have banned same sex couples from adopting. In nearly every adoption case, judges in adoption courts will consider the child’s best interests when making adoption decisions.

Related Resources for Connecticut Adoption Laws:

Depending on the circumstances of your adoption, the applicable state law can vary greatly. You can review specific statutes in FindLaw’s adoption law section or get a more general overview in our adoption section.

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