District of Columbia Child Support Guidelines

Calculating child support is extremely important when trying to figure out what kind of a budget a single parent will be able to live on. In fact, many parents are unaware of how much raising a child actually costs. District of Columbia child support guidelines provide specific rules which determine how much a parent is owed depending on whether there is shared or sole custody. The District of Columbia Child Support Services Division also provides parents with several resources to help make this ongoing ordeal a manageable process. This is a quick summary of the child support guidelines in the District of Columbia.

District of Columbia Child Support Guidelines: Opening a Case

In order to receive child support in the District of Columbia, a custodial parent must open a case with the District of Columbia Child Support Services Division. After the custodial parent fulfills the necessary requirements, the non-custodial parent will have to pay money to the custodial parent for the care of the child or children. Properly managing the case is also necessary in order to begin receiving these payments from the non-custodial parent.

The following table outlines the specifics of District of Columbia child support guidelines.

Code Sections

District of Columbia Official Code §16-916.01: Child Support Guideline

Shared Physical Custody

According to District of Columbia child support guidelines, where a child spends 35% or more of the time during the year with each parent, there will be a presumption that the parents have shared physical custody of the child. Child support will be calculated through this statutory procedure.

Sole Custody

Where the presumption of shared physical custody does not apply because the child does not spend 35% or more of the time during the year with each parent, It will be presumed that there is sole physical custody. Child support will be calculated through this statutory procedure.

Income Share Model

According to the Income Shares model, each parent has a duty to provide support for the child. The model calculates the amount spent on the children by determining what is spent on "adult" costs and calculating the reduction in those expenditures once a child becomes part of the family. Each parent's share of the support obligation for the child is based on that parent's percentage share of the total parental income, after certain adjustments are made.

Completely discerning the District of Columbia child support laws can be difficult. However, the District of Columbia Child Support Services Division provides a child support calculator and other tools to help estimate your obligations under these laws. If you are dealing with child support issues and would like legal assistance, you can contact a District of Columbia child support lawyer through FindLaw. Visit FindLaw's sections on child support and family law for more articles and information on this topic.

Research the Law

Related Resources

Next Steps: Search for a Local Attorney

Contact a qualified attorney.