Georgia Temporary Restraining Order Laws

A restraining order is a court order directing someone to do or not do certain things. It's a piece of paper a judge sign,s stating the terms someone must follow or else risk legal consequences.

In Georgia, it's known as a "Family Violence Protection Order." It offers civil legal protection from domestic violence to both male and female victims. This order prohibits the offender from having contact with the victim for a specified period of time. If a person is found to violate a restraining or protective order, he or she could he or she can be jailed and charged with a separate crime including aggravated stalking.

Types of Family Violence Protection Orders

In Georgia, there are two types of Family Violence Protection Orders:

  • Temporary Ex Parte Orders (TRO); and
  • Family Violence Protection Orders.

The following table highlights the main provisions of the Georgia's Family Violence Protection Orders. See Harassment, Restraining Orders, and Filing a Domestic Violence Lawsuit for more information.

Code Sections The Family Violence Act: O.C.G.A. §19-13-1 et seq., Protective Orders: §19-13-2 et. seq.,
Relationship Requirement Current or former spouses, persons who are parents of the same child, parents and children, stepparents and stepchildren, foster parents and foster children, or persons currently or formerly living in the same household.
Type of Orders

Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) or Family Violence Protection Order

TRO A temporary court order meant to protect someone from immediate danger.
Length of a TRO 30 Days or until your next court hearing
How to Apply

File a petition in court, defendant does not need to be present.

Other Types of Protective Orders

Family Violence Protective Orders: More permanent court orders that may be issued after a hearing in which both persons have a chance to tell their sides of the story. Family Violence Protection Orders last up to one year, but can be extended for up to three years (a "permanent" order).

Penalty for Violation of Protective Orders Contempt of Court and/or a misdemeanor with up to 12 months in jail and a $1,000 fine. Can also be considered "stalking" or "aggravated stalking" and can be sentenced as either a misdemeanor or a felony

Resources

Get Your Domestic Violence Case Reviewed for Free

If you've been charged with a domestic violence crime, you'll want to know the law and the consequences surrounding a conviction. Because domestic laws can sometimes get complicated, it may also be a good idea to contact an experienced Georgia domestic violence lawyer for a free case review. That way, you'll know more about your legal situation moving forward.

Next Steps: Search for a Local Attorney

Contact a qualified attorney.