Louisiana Tenant Rights Laws

Each state's laws govern the relationship between landlord and tenant. In particular, your rights as a tenant are preserved to ensure safe living situations. If you're a renter in Louisiana, or are considering entering into a residential lease, read on to learn more about your legal rights as a tenant.

Louisiana Tenants Rights Laws Overview

Louisiana law details the rights and obligations of both landlords and tenants. As a renter in Louisiana, it's wise to be familiar with certain critical provisions, including the timeline for the return your security deposit and your landlord's obligation to maintain your unit in a habitable condition.

That being said, Louisiana doesn't recognize some tenants' rights that many other states do. Notably, Louisiana does not have laws:

  • Limiting the amount of a security deposit a landlord can require
  • Prohibiting landlords from retaliating against you for exercising your legal rights
  • Governing circumstances under which a landlord can enter your rental unit

The below chart provides details of Arizona's tenants' rights laws at a glance.

Statutes

Security Deposits

  • Louisiana places no limitations on how much a landlord can collect as security deposit
  • Landlord must return tenant's security deposit within one month of tenant vacating unit

Paying Rent

  • Rent must be fixed either at a certain sum, or determinable through a method agreed to by the parties
  • Rent is due at the beginning of the term
  • Louisiana does not have any laws requiring landlords to give a specified amount of notice before raising rent

Living Conditions

  • Landlord is obligated to maintain property in suitable condition for the purpose for which it was leased
  • If landlord refuses to make certain repairs, Louisiana tenants can terminate lease, or "deduct and repair" for necessary repairs
  • Louisiana statutes do not regulate landlord entry or notice to enter

Discrimination

  • The Louisiana Equal Housing Opportunity Act prohibits housing discrimination because of a person's race, color, national origin, sex, religion, disability, or familial status

Ending or Renewing a Tenancy

  • A landlord can dissolve the lease upon nonpayment of rent by tenant
  • A lease for a fixed term terminates at the end of that term, with no need of notice by either party
  • A month-to-month lease can be terminated by landlord or tenant with notice 10 days before the end of that month
  • A lease for a term less than a month but more than a week can be terminated by giving notice at least 5 calendar days before the end of the period
  • A lease term that is less than a week can be terminated at any time prior to the expiration of that period

Retaliation

  • Louisiana does not have a statute prohibiting landlords from retaliating against tenants for exercising legal rights

Note: State regulations are always subject to change through the passage of new legislation, rulings in the higher courts (including federal decisions), ballot initiatives, and other means. While we strive to provide the most current information available, please consult an attorney or conduct your own legal research to verify the state law(s) you are researching.

Related Louisiana Tenant's Rights Resources

Get a Free Evaluation of Your Landlord/Tenant Case

If you are having trouble with your landlord or rental situation, you understand how frustrating this situation can be. It's important to understand how the law applies to you as a Louisiana tenant. Also, consider meeting with an experienced real estate lawyer for your free landlord/tenant case evaluation.

Next Steps: Search for a Local Attorney

Contact a qualified attorney.