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Maryland Workers' Compensation Laws

Maryland is home to diplomats, government employees, and America's Navy. Whether you prefer to spend your free time on land or on the water, you know that when it comes time to work, dedication and commitment are necessary to produce lasting products. But if you are injured at work, your focus needs to shift to your own rehabilitation. If you suffer a work-related injury, your employer is required under Maryland workers' compensation laws to provide you with benefits to help with your recovery.

The table and accompanying summaries below explain the most important aspects of Maryland workers' comp laws.

Statute Section

§ 9-101, et seq.

Choice of Doctor

Filing Time Limits

Notice to employer:

  • 1 year for occupational disease (§ 9-705)
  • 10 days for accidental injury (§ 9-704)
  • Filing a claim: 7 years (§ 9-501)

Benefit Limits

Mental or Heart Injury Covered

Coverage

Maryland has several specific provisions which apply only to firefighters, rescue squad members, police officers, and employees in similar positions considered high-risk. These provisions presume that such an employee has an occupational disease suffered in the line of duty if the individual has heart disease, lung disease, hypertension, or similar conditions. Additionally, hearing loss is covered in most cases. Maryland does not explicitly cover mental injuries, but there have been cases where the Maryland Court of Appeals determined that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was a compensable occupational disease.

Like most states, Maryland does not cover intentional, self-inflicted injuries, or injuries incurred as a result of the employee's intoxication.

Benefits

Maryland offers wage replacement, medical treatment, and vocational rehabilitation. Wage replacement is equal to two-thirds of your average weekly wage, subject to the state-imposed maximum. You receive your medical treatment from any physician you wish, and that physician can only charge you the rates permitted by the Workers' Compensation Commission. The Commission sets the rates for everything from examinations to expert testimony. If you are ultimately unable to return to your occupation, Maryland offers vocational rehabilitation to help you find a new occupation.

Dispute Resolution

The Maryland workers' compensation claim process is explained by this flow chart. If your claim is denied or you disagree with the amount of your wage benefits, you may request a hearing with the Commission. At the hearing, you or your attorney will present evidence supporting your position. This evidence may be in the form of documentation proving your average weekly wage, testimony from your physician proving the extent of your disability, and/or testimony from your coworkers proving certain conditions in your work environment. After the hearing, an order will be issued dictating the benefits your employer's workers' comp insurer owes you. If either you or your employer disagrees with the order, either of you may appeal the order to the Maryland Court.

Get a Free Claim Review from a Skilled Maryland Attorney

Work-related injuries can put employees in a tough spot. You want your employer to see you as a committed and hard-working team member, but you also don’t want to exacerbate your injury by not seeking the treatment and rest time you need to fully recover. The law requires your employer to carry special insurance coverage to protect both you and your employer from the financial ramifications of workplace injuries. If you were injured at work and you need legal assistance, get a confidential, free claim review from a skilled Maryland attorney.

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