Nebraska Computer Crimes Laws

The term computer crime can include a number of different offenses but generally pertains to the access of a computer or network by force or without authorization, theft of data or goods using computer or network, or the destruction of another party's computer or network. For instance, an individual hacking into a financial institution's network without authorization and doubling the amount of money in his savings account most certainly would be considered computer crime (and probably would include additional charges). Identity theft, while often committed with the help of a computer and a computer network, typically is covered by its own statute.

See FindLaw's Cyber Crimes section for related articles and resources.

Nebraska Computer Crime Law at a Glance

Nebraska classifies some computer crimes as misdemeanors, including unauthorized access creating a public risk or compromising data security, while felony charges are reserved for acts that result in theft of more than $1,000 worth of property, death, or other more serious results.

See the following chart for more details about the Nebraska computer crime statute.

Code Section 28-1343, et seq.
Mental State Required for Prosecution Intentionally
Misdemeanor Computer Crimes Commission of unauthorized computer access in a manner that creates risk to public health/safety is class I misdemeanor; commission of unauthorized computer access in a manner that compromises the security of data is class II misdemeanor; unlawfully accessing computer to obtain confidential public info is class II misdemeanor; second or subsequent offense is a class I misdemeanor; accessing without authorization or exceeding authorization is class V misdemeanor; second or subsequent offense is class II
Felony Computer Crimes Access with intent to deprive or obtain property/services is a class IV felony; if value of property/services is $1,000 or more, then class III felony; access and damage, disruption, or distribution of destructive computer program, then class IV felony; if losses with a value of $1,000 or more, then class III felony; if causes grave risk of causing death, then class IV felony
Attempt Considered a Crime? No
Civil Lawsuit Permitted? No

Note: State laws are constantly changing through the enactment of new statutes or other means. You may choose to contact a Nebraska criminal defense attorney or conduct your own legal research to verify the state law(s) you are researching.

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