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Nebraska Lemon Laws

Cars depreciate in value so quickly because so much depends on how well the car is maintained and it's difficult to know for sure how well a used car will perform. So when you buy a new car, truck, or motorcycle, you expect it to work as new -- without defects and without significant downtime for repairs. A new vehicle with a major defect (or "nonconformity") that reduces its value or renders it inoperable is commonly called a lemon.

State "lemon laws," therefore, are intended to protect consumers from being stuck with new vehicles that fail to live up to the terms of their warranties. These laws require the dealer and/or manufacturer to either replace or refund a new vehicle that fails to live up to its warranty within a specified amount of time or mileage limit, after attempts to remedy problem are made.

Nebraska Lemon Law: The Basics

Nebraska's lemon law is very similar to lemon laws in other states, requiring the dealer/manufacturer to replace or refund a vehicle with an unresolved problem within one year of the car's delivery or by the end of the warranty period (whichever is earlier).

Additional details of Nebraska lemon law are listed below. See FindLaw's Lemon Law section for additional articles.

Code Section 60-2701, et seq.
Title of Act Not specified
Definition of Defects Nonconformity to all applicable express warranties which significantly affects the use or market value of vehicle
Time Limit for Manufacturer Repair Term of such express warranties or during period of 1 year following date of original delivery of new vehicle to consumer, whichever is earlier
Remedies Replace with comparable vehicle or accept return and refund full purchase price including all sales tax, license fees, registration fees, and any similar government charges, less a reasonable allowance for consumer's use

Note: State laws are always subject to change at any time, usually through the enactment of newly signed legislation but also through decisions by higher courts and other means. You may want to contact a Nebraska lemon law attorney or conduct your own legal research to verify the state law(s) you are researching.

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