Are You a Legal Professional?

Nevada Right to Work Laws

Nationally, union members accounted for 11.3 percent of employed wage and salary workers in 2013, the same as in 2012. In Nevada in 2013, union members accounted for 14.6 percent of wage and salary workers in the states. That is nearly identical to the 14.7 percent in 2012, according to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

A growing number of states have adopted so-called "right to work" laws that prohibit union security agreements, which are contracts between employers and unions determining the extent to which employees may be compelled to join a union. In states that have passed these laws, employees in unionized workplaces may refuse to join the union but still may enjoy the benefits of union membership, including the compensation negotiated by union officers.

Overview of Nevada's Right to Work Law

Nevada law states that employees may not be required to join a union or pay dues as a condition of employment. Additional details about Nevada's right to work law are listed in the following chart. See FindLaw's Unions section to learn more.

Code Section 613.230, et seq.
Policy on Union Membership, Organization, etc. No person shall be denied the opportunity to obtain or retain employment because of nonmembership in a labor organization.
Prohibited Activity Agreements prohibiting employment because of nonmembership in labor organization; strike or picketing to force or induce employer to make agreement; compelling person to join labor organization, strike, or leave employment; conspiracy to cause discharge or denial of employment or to induce refusal of work on basis of membership.
Penalties Any act in violation shall be illegal and void; liable for damages; injunctive relief.

Note: State laws are always subject to change, usually through higher court decisions, voter-approved ballot initiatives, or the passage of new legislation. You may want to contact a Nevada employment law attorney or conduct your own legal research to verify the law(s) you are researching.

The Right to Work Debate

In states that have not passed right to work laws, employees may still decline union membership in accordance with federal law. Meanwhile, unions are required to represent everyone in the bargaining unit, regardless of their union status, so they often require a monthly payment (less than union dues). Workers who refuse to pay this fee may be fired in states without right to work laws.

Supporters of right to work laws say it is unfair and even coercive to require someone to join a union if they don't want to. But opponents of these laws argue that they are only meant to weaken unions, since unions need paying members in order to thrive.

Research the Law

Nevada Right to Work Laws: Related Resources

Next Step Search and Browse
Contact a qualified attorney.
(e.g., Chicago, IL or 60611)