New Hampshire Computer Crimes Laws

So many crimes are at least aided by the use of computer technology, but a computer crime generally involves the access of a computer or network without authorization; theft of data or goods using computer or network; or the destruction of another party's computer or network. For example, a university student who breaks into the registrar's computer network and changes his grades may be charged with a computer crime. Computer crimes involving theft or substantial monetary damages typically are charged as felonies. Identity theft is often committed with the help of a computer, but it is not considered computer crime because the use of computers is not necessary for identity theft.

See FindLaw's Cyber Crimes section for related articles and resources.

Overview of New Hampshire Computer Crime Laws

New Hampshire statute defines computer crime as the unauthorized access to a computer or network, theft of computer services, misuse or destruction of computer, and related offenses. Accidental access of secured networks or computers is not a crime. Cases involving damages of less than $500 are charged as misdemeanors, while those with $500 or more in damages are charged as felonies.

See the following chart for more details about the New Hampshire computer crime statute.

Code Section 638:16, et seq.
Computer Crime Offenses
  • Unauthorized access to a computer or computer network
  • Theft of computer services
  • Interruption of computer services
  • Misuse of computer or computer network information
  • Destruction of computer equipment
  • Computer contamination
Mental State Required for Prosecution Knowingly
Misdemeanor Computer Crimes Computer crime is a misdemeanor if damage is $500 or less
Felony Computer Crimes Computer crime with damages exceeding $1,000 is a class A felony; computer crime with damages exceeding $500 or offender's conduct creates risk of physical injury is a class B felony
Attempt Considered a Crime? No
Civil Lawsuit Permitted? No

Note: State laws are always subject to change through a number of processes, including enactment of newly signed legislation and decisions from higher court. You should contact a New Hampshire criminal defense attorney or conduct your own legal research to verify the state law(s) you are researching.

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