New York Legal Holidays Laws

General Overview of Legal Holidays

Legal holidays are days on which most government offices are typically closed, while government employees receive holiday pay (which is equal to their regular rate of pay). Many private sector employees who work on holidays may qualify for holiday pay (150% of hourly rate), or get paid days off, but it's up to the employer and may be included in your employment contract.

Federal legal holidays include New Year's Day, Thanksgiving, Labor Day, and Christmas, just to name a few.

New York Legal Holiday Laws at a Glance

As is required of all states, New York recognizes the same legal holidays as the federal government. While some states have additional legal holidays that reflect the history and culture of the state, New York does not. However, public schools in the Empire State are closed on the following holidays, which are not always on the same date each year:

  • Lunar New Year (often referred to as "Chinese New Year" but celebrated throughout Asia)
  • Eid al-Fitr (marks the end of Muslim holy month of Ramadan and is celebrated with a feast)
  • Eid al-Adha (Muslim holiday marking the end of the Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca)
  • Diwali (Hindu festival of lights, celebrated each autumn)

Need Legal Help with a New York Wage and Hour Violation?

Employers are required to pay minimum wage, provide breaks, pay overtime (where applicable), and generally follow the wage and hour requirements imposed by state and federal law. Also, employers must follow any contractual agreements with employees. Courts may award lost wages and other damages to plaintiffs for violations of labor laws.

If you believe you are entitled to holiday pay, as provided by the terms of your employment contract, or you have any other questions about wage and hour laws, an employment lawyer may be able to help.

Legal holidays in New York are listed in the table below. See FindLaw's Wages and Benefits section for more information.

Code Section Gen. Constr. Law §24, et seq.
Holidays New Year's Day; Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Birthday; Washington's Birthday; Lincoln's Birthday; Memorial Day; Independence Day; Labor Day; Columbus Day; Veterans Day; Thanksgiving; Christmas Flag Day; any general election day

Note: State laws are constantly changing -- contact a New York attorney or conduct your own legal research to verify the state law(s) you are researching.

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