North Dakota Cocaine Laws

Cocaine is a powerful stimulant drug with a high potential for abuse that is illegal under federal and all state laws. Possession of the drug usually carries a stiffer penalty for marijuana or other recreational drugs, Even the possession of a tiny amount of cocaine is punishable by prison time in many states, but more and more states have adopted a "harm reduction" approach that employs drug treatment instead of prison.

North Dakota Cocaine Laws at a Glance

Simple possession of cocaine in North Dakota -- any amount -- may be charged as a Class C felony, punishable by up to five years in prison (up to 10 years if within a school zone). The state has mandatory minimum sentences for some offenses, including a three-year minimum for a second conviction for selling the drug. However, many of those charged with possession may avoid jail by pleading guilty and completing a drug treatment program.

Additional details of North Dakota's cocaine laws are listed in the table below. See FindLaw's Drug Charges section to learn more.

Code Section 19-03.1-01, et seq.
Possession Any amount: Class C felony (up to 5 yrs. and/or $5,000); Within 1000 ft. of school: Class B felony (up to 10 yrs. and/or $10,000)  
Manufacture, Sale, or Intent to Sell Class B felony: up to 10 yrs. and/or up to $10,000.; 2nd offense: at least 3 yrs. and up to 10 yrs.; 3rd and subsequent offenses: mandatory 10 yrs.; If over 500 g. of cocaine or over 5 g. of crack: Class A felony; Sale within 1000 ft. of school or to a minor: at least 4 yrs.; Selling to a minor by an 18 year old; Subsequent offense: 8 yrs
Trafficking -
Is Drug Court an Option? Yes (see North Dakota's Parole and Probation Services page for more details)

Note: State laws, particularly drug laws, may change at any time through the enactment of newly signed legislation or other means. You should contact a North Dakota drug crime attorney or conduct your own legal research to verify the state law(s) you are researching.

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