Oklahoma Adoption Laws

States regulate the adoption process, requirements for adults who wish to adopt, consent requirements for adoptees, home residency requirements, and other factors relating to adoption. It can get much more complicated when prospective parents want to adopt a child from another country (see FindLaw's International Adoption section to learn more). While the specifics differ from state to state, most  state laws allow any child who needs a home to be adopted, while individuals who wish to adopt must meet certain criteria. Most states also require what is known as a "home residency" or "home study" before the adoption is finalized, which gives the adoptive family a chance to transition into their new role.

Oklahoma Adoption Laws at a Glance

Oklahoma statutes allow any individual to be adopted, while anyone 12 years and older must give their consent first. In order to adopt in the state, you must be a married couple (or either if the other spouse is the child's parent), an unmarried person over 21, or a married person over 21 who is legally separated from a spouse.

The Oklahoma Department of Human Services provides a directory of non-profit adoption services in the state and relevant state code on adoption. The following table lists additional details of adoption laws in Oklahoma. See FindLaw's Adoption section for more information.

Code Section Tit.10 ยง7501-1.1, et seq.
Who May Be Adopted Any person; any adult with his consent
Age that Child's Consent Needed 12 years and older.
Who May Adopt Husband and wife, or either if other spouse is parent of child; unmarried person 21 years or older; married person 21 years or older who is legally separated from spouse.
Home Residency Required Prior to Finalization of Adoption? 6 months, discretionary
State Agency/Court Department of Human Services/District
Statute of Limitations to Challenge 1 year

Note: State laws are constantly changing, most often through the passage of new legislation or decisions from higher courts. Be sure to contact an Oklahoma adoption law attorney or conduct your own legal research to verify the state law(s) you are researching.

The Effort to Standardize U.S. Adoption Laws

States have been unable to agree on standardized adoption legislation, despite calls to come up with uniform laws in the name of efficiency and less confusion when children are adopted across state lines. The Uniform Adoption Act of 1994 received its fair share of criticism from a number of adoption organizations, including complaints that its confidentiality requirements were

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