Oregon Credit and Debit Card Fraud

As fewer and fewer people carry cash and more and more carry plastic, we continue to see a rise in the incidents of credit and debit card fraud. Thankfully, the Beaver State has laws to protect the public from these types of crimes. Read on to learn more about how Oregon law treats credit and debit card fraud.

Oregon Credit and Debit Card Fraud Laws:

The following table outlines Oregon's credit and debit card fraud laws.

Code Section

OR. REV. STAT. § 165.055

What’s Prohibited?

Using a credit card with the intent of injuring or defrauding another person and with knowledge that the card is stolen, forged, revoked, canceled, or use of the card is otherwise unauthorized by either the issuer or the person to whom the card is issued.

"Credit card" means a card, booklet, credit card number or other identifying symbol or instrument used to pay for property or services.

Penalties If the aggregate total amount of property of services the person obtains or attempts to obtain is less than $1,000, it is a Class A misdemeanor punishable by up to one year in jail and up to $6,250 in fines.

If the aggregate total amount of property or services the person obtains or attempts to obtain is $1,000 or more, it is a Class C felony punishable by up to 5 years in prison and up to $125,000 in fines. If money or property was gained, the fine must not exceed double the value of the money or property gained.

The value of single credit card transactions may be added together if the transactions were committed against multiple victims within a 30-day period or against the same vicitim within a 180-day period.

Oregon Credit and Debit Card Fraud Laws: Related Resources

The consequences of credit and debit card fraud can be serious for both the victim and the perpetrator. If you think you have been the victim of fraud, you should file a report with the Oregon Attorney General. If you have been charged with a fraud crime, or would like legal assistance with a fraud matter, you can contact Oregon criminal defense attorney. You can also visit FindLaw’s article on this topic, including Are you Liable for Unauthorized Credit Card Charges.

Next Steps: Search for a Local Attorney

Contact a qualified attorney.