Oregon Disorderly Conduct Laws

Oregon is visited by many seeking to experience its natural beauty, but what happens if you're charged with disorderly conduct while visiting, or even as a resident of the Beaver State? If this ever happens, it's be good to know whether what you have done is actually against the law. This is a quick summary of disorderly conduct laws in Oregon to help guide you.

Oregon Disorderly Conduct Laws

Disorderly conduct in Oregon includes things such as reporting a fake bomb threat, fighting, and making an unreasonable amount of noise. All of these offenses are misdemeanors, but some may cost you more than others.

The following table outlines the specifics of Oregon’s disorderly conduct law.

Code Sections OR. REV. STAT. §§ 166.023, 166.025
What’s Prohibited? Disorderly conduct in the first degree consists of knowingly initiating the false reporting or circulating a false report regarding an alleged hazardous substance, or alleged or impending fire, explosion, catastrophe or other emergency that is in or upon a school with the intent of inconveniencing, annoying, or alarming the public.

Disorderly conduct in the second degree consists of any of the following:

  • Engaging in fighting or violent, or tumultuous or threatening behavior
  • Making unreasonable noise
  • Disturbing a lawful assemby of people without lawful authority
  • Obstructing vehicular or pedestrian traffic in a public area
  • Knowingly initiating the false reporting or circulating a false report regarding an alleged or impending fire, explosion, crime, catastrophe or other emergency
  • Creating a hazardous or physically offensive condition by any act which the person is not licensed or privileged to do
Penalties

Disorderly conduct in the first degree is a Class A misdemeanor punishable by up to one year in jail and up to $6,250 in fines.

Disorderly conduct in the second degree is a Class B misdemeanor punishable by up to six months in jail and up to $2,500 in fines. If any of the second degree acts are knowingly performed within 200 feet of a funeral, it is also be a Class A misdemeanor.

Second and subsequent convictions for disorderly conduct in the first degree is a Class C felony punishable by up to five years in prison and a fine of up to $125,000.

Oregon Disorderly Conduct Laws: Related Resources

If you’ve been charged with disorderly conduct and would like legal assistance, you can contact an Oregon criminal defense attorney. You can also visit FindLaw’s sections on Disorderly Conduct and Public Safety Violations for more articles and information on this topic.

Next Steps: Search for a Local Attorney

Contact a qualified attorney.