Oregon Insurance Fraud Laws

Although there is no singular general law prohibiting insurance fraud in Oregon, the Beaver State has a few laws regarding specific types of insurance fraud. The following article explains how Oregon law addresses and penalizes cases of insurance fraud. Read on to learn more.

Oregon Insurance Fraud Related Laws:

The following table outlines Oregon's insurance fraud laws.

Code Sections

OR. REV. STAT. §§ 165.692, 165.990 Health Insurance

OR. REV. STAT. § 656.990 Workers Compensation Insurance

What’s Prohibited? Knowingly making a claim which includes a false statement or representation of a material fact in order to receive a health care payment or knowingly concealing or omitting information to obtain a payment to which the person is not entitled or for a payment greater than that to which the person is entitled.

Knowingly making a false statement or representation to the workers compensation board, its employees, board chairperson, director of department of consumer and business services, director's employees, insurer, or self insured employer, in order to obtain a benefit or payment via the workers compensation system.

Penalties The district attorney or Attorney General may seek prosecution for making a false claim for health care payment. Making a false claim for health care payment is a Class C felony punishable by up to 5 years in prison and up to $125,000 in fines.

Making a false statement or representation in order to obtain workers compensation benefits is a Class A misdemeanor punishable by up to 1 year in prison and up to $6,250 in fines.

How do I File a Complaint Against an Oregon Insurance Company?

If you are having problems with an insurance company or agent, a complaint may be filed with the Oregon Insurance Division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services.

Oregon Insurance Fraud Law: Related Resources

Insurance fraud laws can sometimes be complicated. It may be a good idea to consult an experienced Oregon criminal defense attorney if you have questions about your specific situation. You can also visit the Findlaw section on insurance fraud for more general information.

Next Steps: Search for a Local Attorney

Contact a qualified attorney.