Colorado Extortion Laws and Penalties

Created by FindLaw's team of attorney writers and editors.

Extortion occurs when a person uses threats to force someone to do something. It can be to obtain money or property from them, or simply to force them to perform (or not perform) a specific act. The threats can involve anything from physical harm to damage to reputation, and can be directed to the threatened person or someone else. As with most other states, Colorado considers extortion to be a serious crime.

Colorado Extortion Laws and Penalties: An Overview

While reading the actual text of the law can be an important step in conducting legal research, it can be equally important to read a summary of the law for a better understanding of how it works. The following table provides an overview of Colorado extortion laws and penalties as well as links to relevant statutes to help you get started.

Statute(s)

Colorado Revised Statutes, Title 18. Article 3, Part 2, Section 18-3-207 (Criminal Extortion and Aggravated Criminal Extortion)

Defining the Offense(s)

It's criminal extortion for a person, with the intent to induce another against their will, to perform an act or refrain from performing a lawful act, to make a substantial threat to confine or restrain, cause economic hardship or bodily injury to, or damage the property or reputation of the threatened person or someone else and the person threatens to cause these results by:

  • Performing or causing an unlawful act to be performed; or
  • Invoking action by a third party whose interests aren't substantially related to the interest pursued by the person making the threat.

It's also criminal extortion for a person with the intent to induce another to give them money or other valuable items, to threaten to report the immigration status of the threatened person or someone else.

It's aggravated criminal extortion if a person with intent to induce another against their will to perform an act or refrain from performing a lawful act, to make a substantial threat to confine or restrain, cause economic hardship or bodily injury to, or damage the property or reputation of the threatened person or someone else and the person threatens to cause these results by means of:

  • Chemical, biological, or harmful radioactive agents;
  • Weapons; or
  • Poison.
Charges and Penalties

Criminal extortion is a class 4 felony punishable by imprisonment for 2 to 6 years and/or fines between $2,000 and $500,000.

Aggravated criminal extortion is a class 3 felony punishable by imprisonment for 4 to 12 years and/or fines between $3,000 and $750,000.

Related Statute(s)

Colorado Revised Statutes, Title 18. Article 4, Part 3, Section 18-4-301, et seq. (Robbery)

Note: State laws are always subject to change through the passage of new legislation, rulings in the higher courts (including federal decisions), ballot initiatives, and other means. While we strive to provide the most current information available, please consult an attorney or conduct your own legal research to verify the state law(s) you are researching.

Colorado Extortion Laws and Penalties: Related Resources

For more information and resources related to this topic, please click on the links listed below.

Learn More About Colorado Extortion Laws and Penalties from a Lawyer

Extortion is classified as a felony in Colorado, which means that a conviction can lead to significant prison time as well as fines. The best way to find out about how Colorado extortion laws affect your case, and to prepare the best defense, is to speak with a skilled criminal defense attorney in your area today.

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