Hawaii Car Accident Report Basics

Created by FindLaw's team of attorney writers and editors.

No matter which Hawaiian island you're on, the Aloha spirit runs deep. But if you're involved in a car accident there, you might not be feeling that spirit as acutely. Whether you're driving to Volcanoes National Park or headed to work in Honolulu, it's important to know what you're required to do by law, both at the scene of the car crash and afterward. Read on to learn more about Hawaii car accident report basics.

Hawaii Car Accident Report Laws

To avoid fines, license revocation, and even jail time, it's important to know what to do after a Hawaii car accident. First, you must stop, pull over, and render reasonable assistance to anyone who is injured. Then, you'll need to give your name, address, and vehicle registration number to others involved in the accident. If requested, you must show your driver's license or permit to others as well. Failing to follow these steps in an accident that involves serious or substantial injury is considered a felony.

If the accident does result in any injury, death, or damage to property to an apparent extent over $3,000, you must notify the police immediately and by the quickest means of communication available. If the driver is physically unable to notify the police, another occupant of the car must do so.

How to File a Car Crash Report in Hawaii

In addition to notifying local law enforcement, you'll also need to submit a report in writing or in person to the chief of police. This must be done at the earliest practical time, and in any case within 24 hours of the accident. The form, available from the local chief of police or administrator, will also require you to provide verification of financial responsibility such as liability insurance which meets the minimum state requirements.

Hawaii Car Accident Report Laws at a Glance

The chart below provides a summary of state laws related to Hawaii car accident reports, including links to key statutes.

Statutes

Law Enforcement Notification Required

  • Must notify police immediately if accident involves injury, death, or total property damage to an apparent extent of at least $3,000

Report Required

  • Must submit written or in-person report to chief of police if accident involves injury, death, or total property damage to an apparent extent of at least $3,000

Report Deadline

  • Must submit report at earliest practical time, and in any event within 24 hours after the accident

Who Must Report

  • Every driver involved in the accident
  • If driver is physically incapable of reporting, any occupant must make the report; if incapacitated driver is not the owner of the vehicle, the owner must file the report within 10 days of learning about the accident

Note: State regulations are always subject to change through the passage of new legislation, rulings in the higher courts (including federal decisions), ballot initiatives, and other means. While we strive to provide the most current information available, please consult an attorney or conduct your own legal research to verify the state law(s) you are researching.

Hawaii Car Accident Report Basics: Related Resources

Discuss Car Accident Issues with a Hawaii Attorney

Getting in a car accident in the Aloha State can turn a day in paradise into months of stress and frustration. From filing the right reports to dealing with insurance, lawsuits, and even criminal charges, you may need professional help. To make sure you comply with Hawaii car accident report laws and other relevant statutes, get in touch with a Hawaii car accident attorney.

Next Steps: Search for a Local Attorney

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