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Indiana Tenant Rights Laws

Created by FindLaw's team of legal writers and editors.

Whether you are an owner or a renter, you have the right to be safe and healthy in your home. If you are a party to a residential lease in Indiana, it's important to understand your rights as a tenant. Read on to learn more about Indiana tenants' rights laws.

Indiana Tenants Rights Laws at a Glance

Indiana, like all other states, has laws setting forth the rights and responsibilities of both landlords and tenants. As a tenant, you are entitled to have your security deposit or an itemized list of deductions timely returned to you after the termination of a lease. You are also legally ensured a safe and clean living unit that complies with housing codes.

On the other hand, there are some areas of the landlord/tenant relationship that Indiana chooses not to regulate. For example, Indiana doesn't have any laws prohibiting landlords from retaliating against tenants for exercising their legal rights. Also, Indiana doesn't recognize a tenant's right to "repair and deduct."

The below chart provides more details about Indiana tenants' rights laws at a glance.

Statutes

Indiana Code Title 32

Security Deposits

  • Indiana law doesn't limit the amount a landlord can require as a security deposit
  • Security deposit or itemized list of deduction must be provided within 45 days of termination of lease

Paying Rent

  • Unless the specific rental agreement states otherwise, landlord must provide 30 days' notice before raising rent
  • Tenant has a 10 day grace period to pay rent before landlord can evict for non-payment

Living Conditions

  • Landlord must comply with all housing codes and provide a safe and clean dwelling
  • Landlord must provide "reasonable" advanced notice before entering tenant's unit, unless in case of emergencies

Discrimination

  • Landlord can't discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, familial status, handicap, or national origin

Ending or Renewing a Tenancy

  • A year-to-year lease can be terminated by either party by providing 3 months' notice
  • For a lease term of 3 months or fewer, notice to terminate the lease must be equal to one lease period
  • If tenant fails to pay rent, landlord may terminate lease after giving 10 days' notice

Retaliation

  • Indiana doesn't have any laws prohibiting landlord retaliation

Note: State regulations are always subject to change through the passage of new legislation, rulings in the higher courts (including federal decisions), ballot initiatives, and other means. While we strive to provide the most current information available, please consult an attorney or conduct your own legal research to verify the state law(s) you are researching.

Related: Indiana Tenants' Rights Resources

Get a Free Evaluation of Your Landlord/Tenant Case

Uncertainty about your living situation can be frustrating and draining. Understanding your rights as an Indiana tenant is a great first step. Depending on your circumstances, you may also want to consider getting legal advice. FindLaw can help match you with an experienced landlord/tenant attorney for your free case evaluation.

Next Steps: Search for a Local Attorney

Contact a qualified attorney.