Nebraska Car Accident Report Basics

Even though Nebraska drivers get into fewer crashes than those in other parts of the county, drivers in the Cornhusker state still need to be aware of the rule of the road when an accident occurs. According to the Nebraska Department of Transportation, there is an average of 33,000 auto accidents each year, with just over one-third causing injuries. After an accident, the law requires you to pull over and exchange information with the other parties. You’ll also need to follow some basic rules for Nebraska car accident reports.

How to File a Car Crash Report in Nebraska

This chart provides a summary of Nebraska laws and procedures for filing a car crash report.

State Accident Statutes

Nebraska Vehicle Code § 60-699 Reports required of operators

Nebraska Vehicle Code § 60-696 Reporting accident with unattended car/property

Reporting a Crash to Police Call the police immediately when an accident results in:
  • A person injured or killed as a result
  • Total property damage of $1,000 or more
Filing a Crash Report Within 10 days of an accident, file a report with the DMV when:
  • A person injured or killed as a result
  • Property damage to any one person is $1,000 or more
Crash Reports

Note: State laws are always subject to change through the passage of new legislation, rulings in the higher courts (including federal decisions), ballot initiatives, and other means. While we strive to provide the most current information available, please consult an attorney or conduct your own legal research to verify the state law(s) you are researching.

When to Report a Car Accident to Police

When you’re in a minor car accident, you don’t have to call the police. However, it usually is a good idea to have the police come out and make a report. What Nebraska law does require is that you immediately report injury accidents or crashes that result in more than $1,000 in property damage. You must also promptly notify the police if you hit an unattended vehicle or property, such as a fence. Failure to properly report an accident can cause your license to be suspended, or a criminal conviction.

Do the Police Always Make an Accident Report?

It may come as a surprise that the police do not always make an accident report when they respond to a crash scene. Under Nebraska law, an officer is only required to investigate and file a report when an accident results in injury or death to any person, or where estimated property damage of any one person exceeds $1,000. If you are in a minor fender bender, you will need to ask the responding officer to file a report.

Within 10 days of an accident, the original investigation report must be filed with the Accident Records Bureau of the Department of Roads. The officer’s report is public information, so you may purchase a certified copy for a fee. When requesting a report, you will need the following information:

  • Accident date
  • Accident location, including county
  • Driver’s name

How to File an Accident Report

If you are involved in a collision involving injury, death, or damage over $1,000.00 to the property of any one person, state law requires each driver to complete the Driver’s Motor Vehicle Accident Report form DR41. The report form is available online or at your local police department. It must be filed within 10 days of your accident.

The report is divided into two sections. In the first half, you need to give a statement and diagram explaining what happened. The second section is to establish your insurance coverage at the time of the accident. The form must be signed and mailed to:

Highway Safety – Accident Records Bureau
Nebraska Department of Transportation
P.O. Box 94669
Lincoln, NE 68509-4669

Free Review of Your Auto Accident Claim

Nebraska drivers must carry liability insurance in case of an accident, so getting fixed-up after a minor fender bender should be easy. However, when there is significant property damage or personal injuries, things can get complicated. A local car accident attorney can help you understand your insurance company's reporting requirements, how to get compensated for your medical bills, and even how to file a lawsuit if one is necessary. Start the process by getting a free case review from a Nebraska attorney at no obligation.

Next Steps: Search for a Local Attorney

Contact a qualified attorney.