What to Do After a Truck Accident in North Carolina

Created by FindLaw's team of legal writers and editors.

Even if you don't experience significant injuries, being involved in a car or truck accident can be unnerving. Unfortunately, accidents are pretty much a daily occurrence throughout the U.S. Because of this, states have created a variety of laws and regulations to help you understand what to do after a car or truck accident.

Commercial Trucking

The federal government and most states have additional rules and regulations when it comes to commercial trucking. In North Carolina, motor vehicles that transport passengers or goods across state lines must register with the International Registration Plan if they meet the following criteria:

  • Have two axles and weigh over 26,000 pounds; or
  • Have three or more axles.

North Carolina additionally requires commercial motor vehicles to have a minimum of $750,000 in liability insurance. The minimum increases to $1 million for commercial trucks carrying oil or certain hazardous materials, and $5 million if carrying poison gas or explosives.

What to Do After a Truck Accident in North Carolina: The Basics

Your legal research should always include reading the actual text of all applicable statutes, but it can also help to read an overview of the statute so you can better understand what it says. In the following chart, you'll find a basic overview of what to do after a truck accident in North Carolina as well as links to the relevant statutes.

Statute(s)

North Carolina General Statutes, Chapter 20:

  • Article 2C, Section 20-37.10, et seq. (Commercial Driver License Act)
  • Article 3, Part 10, Section 20-138.1, et seq. (Operation of Vehicles and Rules of the Road)
Reporting Accidents to Law Enforcement

A truck accident must be reported to the police if:

  • There was more than $1,000 in property damage; or
  • Someone was injured or killed.
Statute of Limitations

The statute of limitations for filing a lawsuit after a truck accident will depend on the type of claim:

  • Injury to person: 3 years
  • Property damage: 3 years
  • Wrongful death: 2 years (from the date of the victim's death)

Related Statute(s)

North Carolina General Statutes:

Note: State laws are always subject to change through the passage of new legislation, rulings in the higher courts (including federal decisions), ballot initiatives, and other means. While we strive to provide the most current information available, please consult an attorney or conduct your own legal research to verify the state law(s) you are researching.

What to Do After a Truck Accident in North Carolina: Related Resources

If you'd like additional information and resources related to this topic, please visit the links listed below.

Questions About What to Do After a Truck Accident in North Carolina? Ask a Lawyer

Dealing with an accident can be overwhelming, especially if you've been injured or suffered significant damage to your car. Luckily, you can get professional legal help. Talk to a local personal injury attorney today for additional guidance on what to do after a truck accident in North Carolina.

Next Steps: Search for a Local Attorney

Contact a qualified attorney.