Ohio Theft and Larceny Laws

Ohio Theft and Larceny Laws

Each state has laws criminalizing theft, which can also be called larceny depending on your jurisdiction. While theft and robbery are related offenses, the main difference is that robbery involves an interaction between the offender and the victim, where force or threat of force is usually present. As in many other states, to be convicted under Ohio's theft laws a person must knowingly obtain control over another's property with the purpose to deprive the owner of the property. A person can obtain control by deception, threat, or intimidation. Ohio also considers it a theft if someone gets property beyond the scope of the property owner's consent.

Although Ohio has one theft statute, thefts are categorized within the statute based on the value/amount that's stolen. The statute also has provisions addressing when specific items are stolen. For example, it's a fourth degree felony to steal a motor vehicle regardless of its value. The penalties for theft vary depending on various factors including the value and character of the stolen property and the victim.

Ohio Theft and Larceny Laws Overview

Below you will find key provisions of theft and larceny laws in Ohio.

Statute(s)

Ohio Revised Code Title XXIX. Crimes Procedure Section 2913.02

Types of Theft and Charges

Petty Theft: if the theft doesn't fall in any other category, it's classified as a first degree misdemeanor.

Theft: value of stolen property/services is $1,000 to less than $7,500 (or listed in Section 2913.71), it's a fifth degree felony.

Grand Theft: value stolen property/services is $7,500 to less than $150,000, it's a fourth degree felony.

Aggravated Theft: value of property/services is:

  • $150,000 to less than $750,000, it's a third degree felony.
  • $750,000 to less than $1.5 million, it's a second degree felony.
  • $1.5 million or more, it's a first degree felony.

*Please see the statute for a comprehensive list of the types of theft.

Penalties

Conviction of petty theft can result in jail time for up to 180 days and fines not exceeding $1,000. If convicted under theft, grand theft, or aggravated theft, more serious prison time and fines can be imposed:

  • First degree felony: prison term of 3 to 11 years and fines not exceeding $20,000.
  • Second degree felony: prison term of 2 to 8 years and fines not exceeding $15,000.
  • Third degree felony: prison term of 9, 12, 18, 24, 30, or 36 months and fines not exceeding $10,000.
  • Fourth degree felony: prison term of 6 to 18 months and fines not exceeding $5,000.
  • Fifth degree felony: prison term of 6 to 12 months and fines not exceeding $2,500.

Related Offenses

Ohio Revised Code Title XXIX. Crimes Procedure Sections:

  • 2913.03 (Unauthorized Use of a Vehicle)
  • 2913.04 (Unauthorized Use of Property)
  • 2913.041 (Possession of an Unauthorized Device)
  • 2913.05 (Telecommunications Fraud)
  • 2913.06 (Unlawful Use of a Telecommunications Device)

Note: State laws are always subject to change through the passage of new legislation, rulings in the higher courts (including federal decisions), ballot initiatives, and other means. While we strive to provide the most current information available, please consult an attorney or conduct your own legal research to verify the state law(s) you are researching.

Ohio Theft and Larceny Laws: Related Resources

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Get Legal Help with Your Theft or Larceny Case in Ohio

Depending on the circumstances, theft or larceny can be a serious crime in Ohio. If you're facing any of these charges in Ohio, you may want to contact a local criminal defense attorney in Ohio to discuss the evidence against you. It could make all the difference in your case.

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