Texas Child Support Guidelines

Whether you're the custodial or noncustodial parent, child support payments are solely for the benefit of the child and determined through the use of formulas and specific guidelines. Support amounts are generally based on a percentage of the noncustodial parent's income. When calculating payment amounts in Texas, courts will first determine the monthly net resources of the obligor (the parent paying child support), which is that person's income minus the following:

  • Social Security taxes;
  • Federal income tax (based on tax rate for a single person claiming one personal exemption and the standard deductions);
  • State income tax;
  • Union dues (if they are being withheld); and
  • Expenses for health insurance coverage for obligor's children (if these payments are being withheld).

Using the monthly net resources as a guide, the court will then apply a percentage based on the number of children before the court and other factors.

Texas Child Support Guidelines at a Glance

If you owe child support or are trying to secure support for your child, an attorney is best equipped to handle the finer points of Texas family law. But the following plain-language charts will help you get a general sense of child support guidelines in the Lone Star State.

Statutes

Texas Family Code Section 154.001, et seq. (Support of Child)

Standard Child Support Guidelines

Child support amounts are based on a percentage of the monthly net resources of the obligor and the number of children:

  • 1 Child: 20%
  • 2 Children: 25%
  • 3 Children: 30%
  • 4 Children: 35%
  • 5 Children: 40%
  • 6+ Children: Not less than the amount for 5 children

Note: These guidelines apply to situations in which the obligor's monthly net resources are no greater than $7,000 (this amount is adjusted every 6 years).

Monthly Child Support Calculator

While the court will have the final say on child support amounts, the Office of the Attorney General of Texas provides a Monthly Child Support Calculator to help you get a general idea.

Multiple Family Adjusted Guidelines

The percentage of net resources required for child support may be decreased if the obligor already has children that they owe a duty to support. Although it may not be appicable in your particular case, the following chart provides an example of how much a child support award may be reduced based on the number of other children already supported by an obligor. In the chart below, note that:

  • The number of children for which the obligor already has a duty to support (0-7) is listed in the left-hand column; and
  • The number of children currently before the court (1-7) is listed in the horizontal row at the top.

No. of Other Children (Below):

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

0

20.00

25.00

30.00

35.00

40.00

40.00

40.00

1

17.50

22.50

27.38

32.20

37.33

37.71

38.00

2

16.00

20.63

25.20

30.33

35.43

36.00

36.44

3

14.75

19.00

24.00

29.00

34.00

34.67

35.20

4

13.60

18.33

23.14

28.00

32.89

33.60

34.18

5

13.33

17.86

22.50

27.22

32.00

32.73

33.33

6

13.14

17.50

22.00

26.60

31.27

32.00

32.62

7

13.00

17.22

21.60

26.09

30.67

31.38

32.00

Note: State laws are always subject to change through the passage of new legislation, rulings in the higher courts (including federal decisions), ballot initiatives, and other means. While we strive to provide the most current information available, please consult an attorney or conduct your own legal research to verify the state law(s) you are researching.

Research the Law

Texas Child Support Guidelines: Related Resources

Confused About Texas Child Support Guidelines? An Attorney Can Help

As you can see, child support in Texas is determined using a number of formulas and considerations, following specific guidelines. If you have any questions or need help getting the support you need, a skilled Texas child support attorney can help protect the interests of you and your child.

Next Steps: Search for a Local Attorney

Contact a qualified attorney.