Wisconsin Marriage Age Requirements Laws

We’ve all been there, haven't we? The thought bubbles up: "When can I run off and get married?" It's a common thought for many a lovestruck couple. So are you serious this time and actually wondering how old you have to be to get married in Wisconsin? That answer generally depends on whether or not you have your parents’ permission to get married. State law governs, and this article will give you a brief summary of the marriage age requirements in Wisconsin.

State Marriage Age Laws

States laws impose age limits for marriage in most cases, particularly for minors without parental consent. These laws typically are intended to protect young people from exploitation. All states allow individuals to marry once they reach the age of majority, which is 18 in most of the country. Wisconsin marriage age requirements are set at 18 for couples without parental consent, and 16 for those with consent.

Marriage Age Requirements in Illinois

The main provisions of Wisconsin marriage age requirements are listed in the table below.

Code Section 765.02
Minimum Legal Age With Parental Consent Male: 16; Female: 16
Minimum Legal Age Without Parental Consent Male: 18; Female: 18
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With everything else to worry about when it comes to planning a wedding, technical marriage requirements and getting the actual marriage license might seem pretty far down on the list. At the county clerk’s office you will need to fill out and sign a marriage license application and present identification, like a driver's license, passport, or birth certificate.

Wisconsin Marriage Age Requirements Laws: Related Resources

Since you don’t want to throw a big wedding party before you're technically married, it makes sense to have all your ducks in a row when it comes to state laws on marriage. If you still have questions, you can also find more general information on this topic in FindLaw’s marriage law section. You can also contact an experienced family law attorney in Wisconsin if you would like legal assistance.

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